Skip to main content

Topic: Why did you stop playing? (Read 3589 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #120
Thanks for your input in this thread. Consider this scenario:

A player and his 5 clan mates go to a dungeon on the other side of the map because they want the local mats. They spend half an hour preparing and waiting for everyone to be ready, 20 minutes riding and an hour farming the dungeon. At the end of their session they get jumped and are wiped. All good, welcome to Darkfall. But now they're naked and 20 minutes from home. They've been playing 2 hours and have battle fatigue, and none of them can be bothered riding back that night. They log out at the chaos stone they respawned at.

The next night the player and two of his clan mates log in. They decide to run back and get some gear and find some village action. They spend 30 minutes running back, 30 minutes messing around organising gear and regs etc and then check the map. They are in orc land, but the nearest live village is in elf land. They decide to go anyway. 30 minutes riding, they get to the village, only to find a group of 10 enemies there waiting to cap it. None of the clannies feel like another long run home and so they decide not to engage. They've spent 90 minutes playing but haven't actually played. 2 of the clannies decide to farm mobs in the area and one has had enough and decides to log. The remaining 2 clannies go to farm mobs in the area, but after 30 minutes of skinning fails and shitty drops, decide they've had enough. They take their loot and begin to ride home, but half way home they are engaged by a roaming group of 5. With depleted gear and low on regs, they die. They've been playing for 2.5 hours and are fatigued, so they decide to log rather than run home.

So, after 2 days, these 6 players have achieved nothing, and now they are seperated in 3 different locations around the map. Both fights they've been engaged in have been at a distinct disadvantage and they were always likely to lose.

How motivated do you think they're going to be to log in tomorrow?

There are clearly lots of flaws in how they played, but it doesn't matter. If you cry "plan" you can add at least an hour of "unproductive play" to the above scenario. If you cry "get better", these guys won't last long enough in the game to get better.

The flaw in your game design is forcing these guys to venture far from home to find fun. You have a localised system, yet that system does not support players locally. The mistake you've made is that you smashed loot tables so hard that players can't farm all the high end mats needed in their local area. Furthermore, they're reliant on markets to somehow supply those mats. Localised markets. Plus VCP timers mean that if they want access to that mechanic they'll likely have to roam far and wide and, because there's only a couple live at a time, every timer is locked down by the most powerful clan.

Every mechanic contributes to a power gap. As that power gap increases, there is less desire for the rest to log in. Add in the necessary "logistics" and the lack of small clan/solo activities such as warfronts, the arms race, the gear race, the smashed loot tables and the tedious crafting and market systems and you get players not having fun and leaving. It's really that simple.

Yes your scenario points out very well that Darkfall is a rather hardcore game that will be very discouraging to some players, especially those who apt to make bad decisions. But it's as much an argument against things like full loot, and FPS high player skill influence as it is against local banking and for faster travel.   You want to make the game easier, and like everyone else have your pet issues that you focus on, in your case faster travel and less localization, there's other threads asking for less player skill in combat, no ones asked for an end to full loot that I know of, but it wouldn't surprise me.

None of this is to say you're wrong, what you personally enjoy or don't is subjective and therefore can't in of itself be wrong. But if Ub3rgames were to take action on every request where would DnD be in terms of a game? We certainly have a vocal forum faction that are happy to have some of the hardcore elements remain, but want to gut all the hardcore RPG elements, and of late I've even seen the opposite where players don't mind the hardcore RPG elements, but want to gut some of the FPS side of the game (nerfing back shot damage of all things). Well if DnD is to be true to the original design goals of Darkfall (which is pretty clearly the intent of Ub3rgames) it has to have the hardcore elements of both FPS and RPGs.  Making bad choices in a game like this is going to hurt, not being good a the PvP combat is going to hurt, which is why more people play battle ground arena type games and MMORPGs like WoW than Darkfall.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #121
As @Zynko said in one of the most recent replies: People didn't feel they were gaining anything when playing.
That's the trend we see in this thread: low reward for effort makes it tedium.

A player will enjoy any activity if it feels rewarding, but our approach to create rewards seems to have been flawed.
We have been over relient on skinning material in an economy which doesn't have the demand for enchanting we expected to see.
That's why coming features will aim at an increased enchanting fluidity, while we add other things as part of the "loot game".

It is a strange issue though, because we had high VCP rewards to justify the trip but that was requested to be nerfed.
If you observe today's enchanting mats market, skins value alone outweigh these rewards in terms of value over time per player.
We have focused on resell value, which may be felt as tedium to most players.

Some point brought by @MaxDamage seem to also illustrate that lack of fluidity in trade.
To him, he finds it a flaw that we encourage locality while keeping things always out of reach. While in old Darkfall that meant having to travel and bring it back (runes + recall), in a localized game this is the basis for the value of trade, and an indirect source of convenience. Even in small distances, a 5 min run from an edge city to a capital city, can be rewarding and safe trade.
However, since it still feels possible to travel and farm yourself, players do it and suffer it as tedium.

This is why we spent a lot of time on the marketplaces since release.
The whole concept of "just out of your reach" for items should be a drive for market value for resources and motivate trade, and subsequently, motivate PvE. You want something someone else has for low effort, you have something for low efforts that someone else wants.
If the value of PvE is to be, at least in part, derived from trade, we need trade fluidity.

And finally comes the issue of too long play sessions.
Even if in theory, killing 10 monsters or 100 monsters has a similar value over time, it lacks "completude".
A dungeon daily, which are generally setup to be the most reliable source of meditation, is a relatively high investment of time.
Hunt quests are forced to last 1h, and have by design lower value per time unit.
Overall, a satisfying play session currently has to be too long, especially for meditation.

There are multiple ways we'd like to address that that should make it easier for casual players to have shorter play sessions and to maintain their meditation when they cannot play.
Generally, through local content that can be consumed in an half hour play session with some variety.

High end meditation costs are however a tool to encourage veteran characters to care about active activities in game.
We realize some dislike to grind, and by design, front loading and decreased returns of xp is something that is needed to reduce the power gap and as a catch up mechanic.
Having increase in costs but similar speed for meditation means that players aiming to top up should flock to the most time effective activities, in other words dungeons and VCPs, where we want to have combat occur.

Tl;DR:
The activity you spend 90% of your time doing in game does not feel worth the time and cannot be chunked in smaller bits.
If being solo you do not feel you can do anything of worth, you won't be online to chat with your clan mate or to respond to a group content offer.
That is to us the biggest issue refraining players from coming online and it makes them drift away.

Thanks for your input in this thread. Consider this scenario:

A player and his 5 clan mates go to a dungeon on the other side of the map because they want the local mats. They spend half an hour preparing and waiting for everyone to be ready, 20 minutes riding and an hour farming the dungeon. At the end of their session they get jumped and are wiped. All good, welcome to Darkfall. But now they're naked and 20 minutes from home. They've been playing 2 hours and have battle fatigue, and none of them can be bothered riding back that night. They log out at the chaos stone they respawned at.

The next night the player and two of his clan mates log in. They decide to run back and get some gear and find some village action. They spend 30 minutes running back, 30 minutes messing around organising gear and regs etc and then check the map. They are in orc land, but the nearest live village is in elf land. They decide to go anyway. 30 minutes riding, they get to the village, only to find a group of 10 enemies there waiting to cap it. None of the clannies feel like another long naked run home and so they decide not to engage. They've spent 90 minutes playing but haven't actually played. 2 of the clannies decide to farm mobs in the area and one has had enough and decides to log. The remaining 2 clannies go to farm mobs in the area, but after 30 minutes of skinning fails and shitty drops, decide they've had enough. They take their loot and begin to ride home, but half way home they are engaged by a roaming group of 5. With depleted gear and low on regs, they die. They've been playing for 2.5 hours and are fatigued, so they decide to log rather than run home.

So, after 2 days, these 6 players have achieved nothing, and now they are seperated in 3 different locations around the map. Both fights they've been engaged in have been at a distinct disadvantage and they were always likely to lose.

How motivated do you think they're going to be to log in tomorrow?

There are clearly lots of flaws in how they played, but it doesn't matter. If you cry "plan" you can add at least an hour of "unproductive play" to the above scenario. If you cry "get better", these guys won't last long enough in the game to get better.

The flaw in your game design is forcing these guys to venture far from home to find fun. You have a localised system, yet that system does not support players locally. The mistake you've made is that you smashed loot tables so hard that players can't farm all the high end mats needed in their local area. Furthermore, they're reliant on markets to somehow supply those mats. Localised markets. Plus VCP timers mean that if they want access to that mechanic they'll likely have to roam far and wide and, because there's only a couple live at a time, every timer is locked down by the most powerful clan.

Every mechanic contributes to a power gap. As that power gap increases, there is less desire for the rest to log in. Add in the necessary "logistics" and the lack of small clan/solo activities such as warfronts, throw in the arms race, the gear race, the smashed loot tables and the tedious crafting and market systems and you get players not having fun and leaving, and new players not joining. It's really that simple.

Very well put, its crazy how @ub3rgames and their fanboys don't understand how bad it is. Or maybe they do, but are just too stubborn to turn back now.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #122
Thanks for your input in this thread. Consider this scenario:

A player and his 5 clan mates go to a dungeon on the other side of the map because they want the local mats. They spend half an hour preparing and waiting for everyone to be ready, 20 minutes riding and an hour farming the dungeon. At the end of their session they get jumped and are wiped. All good, welcome to Darkfall. But now they're naked and 20 minutes from home. They've been playing 2 hours and have battle fatigue, and none of them can be bothered riding back that night. They log out at the chaos stone they respawned at.

The next night the player and two of his clan mates log in. They decide to run back and get some gear and find some village action. They spend 30 minutes running back, 30 minutes messing around organising gear and regs etc and then check the map. They are in orc land, but the nearest live village is in elf land. They decide to go anyway. 30 minutes riding, they get to the village, only to find a group of 10 enemies there waiting to cap it. None of the clannies feel like another long run home and so they decide not to engage. They've spent 90 minutes playing but haven't actually played. 2 of the clannies decide to farm mobs in the area and one has had enough and decides to log. The remaining 2 clannies go to farm mobs in the area, but after 30 minutes of skinning fails and shitty drops, decide they've had enough. They take their loot and begin to ride home, but half way home they are engaged by a roaming group of 5. With depleted gear and low on regs, they die. They've been playing for 2.5 hours and are fatigued, so they decide to log rather than run home.

So, after 2 days, these 6 players have achieved nothing, and now they are seperated in 3 different locations around the map. Both fights they've been engaged in have been at a distinct disadvantage and they were always likely to lose.

How motivated do you think they're going to be to log in tomorrow?

There are clearly lots of flaws in how they played, but it doesn't matter. If you cry "plan" you can add at least an hour of "unproductive play" to the above scenario. If you cry "get better", these guys won't last long enough in the game to get better.

The flaw in your game design is forcing these guys to venture far from home to find fun. You have a localised system, yet that system does not support players locally. The mistake you've made is that you smashed loot tables so hard that players can't farm all the high end mats needed in their local area. Furthermore, they're reliant on markets to somehow supply those mats. Localised markets. Plus VCP timers mean that if they want access to that mechanic they'll likely have to roam far and wide and, because there's only a couple live at a time, every timer is locked down by the most powerful clan.

Every mechanic contributes to a power gap. As that power gap increases, there is less desire for the rest to log in. Add in the necessary "logistics" and the lack of small clan/solo activities such as warfronts, the arms race, the gear race, the smashed loot tables and the tedious crafting and market systems and you get players not having fun and leaving. It's really that simple.

Yes your scenario points out very well that Darkfall is a rather hardcore game that will be very discouraging to some players, especially those who apt to make bad decisions. But it's as much an argument against things like full loot, and FPS high player skill influence as it is against local banking and for faster travel.  You want to make the game easier, and like everyone else have your pet issues that you focus on, in your case faster travel and less localization, there's other threads asking for less player skill in combat, no ones asked for an end to full loot that I know of, but it wouldn't surprise me.

None of this is to say you're wrong, what you personally enjoy or don't is subjective and therefore can't in of itself be wrong. But if Ub3rgames were to take action on every request where would DnD be in terms of a game? We certainly have a vocal forum faction that are happy to have some of the hardcore elements remain, but want to gut all the hardcore RPG elements, and of late I've even seen the opposite where players don't mind the hardcore RPG elements, but want to gut some of the FPS side of the game (nerfing back shot damage of all things). Well if DnD is to be true to the original design goals of Darkfall (which is pretty clearly the intent of Ub3rgames) it has to have the hardcore elements of both FPS and RPGs.  Making bad choices in a game like this is going to hurt, not being good a the PvP combat is going to hurt, which is why more people play battle ground arena type games and MMORPGs like WoW than Darkfall.
I haven't actually asked for anything. All I've done is illustrate one scenario and how game design impacts it. I could put 50 others up for the same purpose.

After all these years I think we can agree that the excuse that Darkfall in its many forms is "hardcore" is just a cop out. You can't just use that term to explain away the player loss. The game needs players and as a consequence needs to be fun.

FWIW, aside from the the list of things I listed earlier in the thread, I feel the key change that needs to be made is a rethink on localisation. I feel that markets should have a global section (mimicking unseen couriers I guess) that gives players better access to mats from other regions, at a cost of course. I also feel that, fundamentally, a player should be able to make all tiers of gear and weapons from mats available in his region. Mats from other regions should be "nice to have" rather than "need to have". For example, for an orc, skin items from alfar should provide alfar qualities and advantages against alfar players.

This is a simplistic example but you get my drift.

In terms of travel, ub3r have stated that no fast travel is necessary to underpin localisation and avoid large clans monopolizing the map. This can be achieved without removing things like the recall mechanic. Having a travel sickness debuff is one way to enable players to run less and play more, without undermining the core localisation philosophy.

Those two examples don't "dumb down the game". They just make it more accessible and fun. I'm sure a one hour brainstorm could come up with a number of other initiatives.

Face it, you're in the minority in a dying game. If you want the game to grow and have a thriving population, you have to accept this, eat humble pie and realise that changes need to be made.
  • Last Edit: April 29, 2018, 04:33:37 am by MaxDamage

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #123
just log in if theres bang when im free
EPOCH

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #124
Is it perhaps worth bringing up that if you're a person into competitive types games there are much better options out there to get that fix?  I get the same rush I use to get from DF by playing CS:GO, DoTA 2 and PUBG.  They may not be MMOs but I do not need to worry about grinding skills up and I can get through a complete match in anywhere from 20 - 90 mins depending on the game. It helps that those are all games right now the gaming community as a whole like.  You can make a video in any of those games and people will care / notice.  Do the same in Darkfall and maybe 20 people will notice?  I'm not into making videos or anything I'm just using that as an example of how little most people care about Darkfall.  Any version of it.

How do you get the same "rush" from those pointless games?

If that's truly the case WHY are even you here?



Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #125
I haven't actually asked for anything. All I've done is illustrate one scenario and how game design impacts it. I could put 50 others up for the same purpose.

After all these years I think we can agree that the excuse that Darkfall in its many forms is "hardcore" is just a cop out. You can't just use that term to explain away the player loss. The game needs players and as a consequence needs to be fun.

FWIW, aside from the the list of things I listed earlier in the thread, I feel the key change that needs to be made is a rethink on localisation. I feel that markets should have a global section (mimicking unseen couriers I guess) that gives players better access to mats from other regions, at a cost of course. I also feel that, fundamentally, a player should be able to make all tiers of gear and weapons from mats available in his region. Mats from other regions should be "nice to have" rather than "need to have". For example, for an orc, skin items from alfar should provide alfar qualities and advantages against alfar players.

This is a simplistic example but you get my drift.

In terms of travel, ub3r have stated that no fast travel is necessary to underpin localisation and avoid large clans monopolizing the map. This can be achieved without removing things like the recall mechanic. Having a travel sickness debuff is one way to enable players to run less and play more, without undermining the core localisation philosophy.

Those two examples don't "dumb down the game". They just make it more accessible and fun. I'm sure a one hour brainstorm could come up with a number of other initiatives.

Face it, you're in the minority in a dying game. If you want the game to grow and have a thriving population, you have to accept this, eat humble pie and realise that changes need to be made.

I think the one thing just about everyone agrees on is the game needs more active players. and your right I like everyone else here is minority in the gaming world, and what we have is niches of niches arguing over how to save their niche game. But I fundamentally disagree that this means changes need to be made as you suggest, since not all but most of the suggestions I see made by players are just about sacrificing game features desired by one Darkfall niche group to satisfy another Darkfall niche group.  The only path to success for this game is for Ub3r to actually deliver the full featured game they have planned, and it is their failure thus far, or in the near future to achieve this that is killing this game more than anything else (just as it did with the original DFO). We don't need a softer, easier Darkfall we need a complete one.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #126
As @Zynko said in one of the most recent replies: People didn't feel they were gaining anything when playing.
That's the trend we see in this thread: low reward for effort makes it tedium.

A player will enjoy any activity if it feels rewarding, but our approach to create rewards seems to have been flawed.
We have been over relient on skinning material in an economy which doesn't have the demand for enchanting we expected to see.
That's why coming features will aim at an increased enchanting fluidity, while we add other things as part of the "loot game".

It is a strange issue though, because we had high VCP rewards to justify the trip but that was requested to be nerfed.
If you observe today's enchanting mats market, skins value alone outweigh these rewards in terms of value over time per player.
We have focused on resell value, which may be felt as tedium to most players.

Some point brought by @MaxDamage seem to also illustrate that lack of fluidity in trade.
To him, he finds it a flaw that we encourage locality while keeping things always out of reach. While in old Darkfall that meant having to travel and bring it back (runes + recall), in a localized game this is the basis for the value of trade, and an indirect source of convenience. Even in small distances, a 5 min run from an edge city to a capital city, can be rewarding and safe trade.
However, since it still feels possible to travel and farm yourself, players do it and suffer it as tedium.

This is why we spent a lot of time on the marketplaces since release.
The whole concept of "just out of your reach" for items should be a drive for market value for resources and motivate trade, and subsequently, motivate PvE. You want something someone else has for low effort, you have something for low efforts that someone else wants.
If the value of PvE is to be, at least in part, derived from trade, we need trade fluidity.

And finally comes the issue of too long play sessions.
Even if in theory, killing 10 monsters or 100 monsters has a similar value over time, it lacks "completude".
A dungeon daily, which are generally setup to be the most reliable source of meditation, is a relatively high investment of time.
Hunt quests are forced to last 1h, and have by design lower value per time unit.
Overall, a satisfying play session currently has to be too long, especially for meditation.

There are multiple ways we'd like to address that that should make it easier for casual players to have shorter play sessions and to maintain their meditation when they cannot play.
Generally, through local content that can be consumed in an half hour play session with some variety.

High end meditation costs are however a tool to encourage veteran characters to care about active activities in game.
We realize some dislike to grind, and by design, front loading and decreased returns of xp is something that is needed to reduce the power gap and as a catch up mechanic.
Having increase in costs but similar speed for meditation means that players aiming to top up should flock to the most time effective activities, in other words dungeons and VCPs, where we want to have combat occur.

Tl;DR:
The activity you spend 90% of your time doing in game does not feel worth the time and cannot be chunked in smaller bits.
If being solo you do not feel you can do anything of worth, you won't be online to chat with your clan mate or to respond to a group content offer.
That is to us the biggest issue refraining players from coming online and it makes them drift away.

Thanks for your input in this thread. Consider this scenario:

A player and his 5 clan mates go to a dungeon on the other side of the map because they want the local mats. They spend half an hour preparing and waiting for everyone to be ready, 20 minutes riding and an hour farming the dungeon. At the end of their session they get jumped and are wiped. All good, welcome to Darkfall. But now they're naked and 20 minutes from home. They've been playing 2 hours and have battle fatigue, and none of them can be bothered riding back that night. They log out at the chaos stone they respawned at.

The next night the player and two of his clan mates log in. They decide to run back and get some gear and find some village action. They spend 30 minutes running back, 30 minutes messing around organising gear and regs etc and then check the map. They are in orc land, but the nearest live village is in elf land. They decide to go anyway. 30 minutes riding, they get to the village, only to find a group of 10 enemies there waiting to cap it. None of the clannies feel like another long naked run home and so they decide not to engage. They've spent 90 minutes playing but haven't actually played. 2 of the clannies decide to farm mobs in the area and one has had enough and decides to log. The remaining 2 clannies go to farm mobs in the area, but after 30 minutes of skinning fails and shitty drops, decide they've had enough. They take their loot and begin to ride home, but half way home they are engaged by a roaming group of 5. With depleted gear and low on regs, they die. They've been playing for 2.5 hours and are fatigued, so they decide to log rather than run home.

So, after 2 days, these 6 players have achieved nothing, and now they are seperated in 3 different locations around the map. Both fights they've been engaged in have been at a distinct disadvantage and they were always likely to lose.

How motivated do you think they're going to be to log in tomorrow?

There are clearly lots of flaws in how they played, but it doesn't matter. If you cry "plan" you can add at least an hour of "unproductive play" to the above scenario. If you cry "get better", these guys won't last long enough in the game to get better.

The flaw in your game design is forcing these guys to venture far from home to find fun. You have a localised system, yet that system does not support players locally. The mistake you've made is that you smashed loot tables so hard that players can't farm all the high end mats needed in their local area. Furthermore, they're reliant on markets to somehow supply those mats. Localised markets. Plus VCP timers mean that if they want access to that mechanic they'll likely have to roam far and wide and, because there's only a couple live at a time, every timer is locked down by the most powerful clan.

Every mechanic contributes to a power gap. As that power gap increases, there is less desire for the rest to log in. Add in the necessary "logistics" and the lack of small clan/solo activities such as warfronts, throw in the arms race, the gear race, the smashed loot tables and the tedious crafting and market systems and you get players not having fun and leaving, and new players not joining. It's really that simple.
I agree with that and I would add that it's the same about getting the meditation points. You travel to a dungeon to do a quest to get meds pts to be able to skill gain offline but get jump by reds and you just lose the few time you had to invest and worst you can't meditate. I have 1 to 2h to play and to be able to catch up on those having plenty of time I'm forced to do meditations quests. For how long will I be forced to do something I don't wanna do to have some fun and fair fights? So many hours on things not cool to do at all. So many hours of your time trying to creates/develops things like frontloading to reduce the gap, to reduce whatever advantage players can get versus others instead of using all your resources to create true content. No more skill gain, no more offline meditation. Simply just log on and do whats funny, pvp, grinding crafting/ressources if you like it. To gear better items. I want to be able to fight anyone now. Nothing like I'm new to the game and be sure next year I'll gank ya.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #127
Hey guys, just checking in, how's everything going? Is it time to admit we told you so or???

This is DND, not any other iteration of DF. Everything is slower, and more local. It is the way it is.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #128
Hey guys, just checking in, how's everything going? Is it time to admit we told you so or???

It was time to admit that shit long ago.

Ub3r laying their incompetence on thick here once again.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #129
Hey guys, just checking in, how's everything going? Is it time to admit we told you so or???

Meh, Ub3rgames has failed to deliver and made some bad decisions in 2018 I'll give you that

Momentum is back in RoA corner for sure, but let's be honest neither is doing that well (despite how much i want them to)

I'd be more excited if RoA devs weren't talking about SEASONS... Darkfall was SUPPOSED to be a persistent open world MMORPG FFA sandbox game with full loot FPS/TPS combat. Now some people over at RoA are trying to turn it into something different IMO

I really don't care which version I just want something populated 24/7 with at least 5,000 active player... preferably 10,000 without having that it just feels like a private server and I refuse to get invested in another dead futureless game like i did UW and 2012 DFO

It's just too frustrating/ disappointing and a waste of time

AFAIC Ub3rgames and BPG should just do whatever the fuck they gotta do to get more people even if that means doing shit I personally don't like.





Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #130
Hey guys, just checking in, how's everything going? Is it time to admit we told you so or???

Meh, Ub3rgames has failed to deliver and made some bad decisions in 2018 I'll give you that

Momentum is back in RoA corner for sure, but let's be honest neither is doing that well (despite how much i want them to)

I'd be more excited if RoA devs weren't talking about SEASONS... Darkfall was SUPPOSED to be a persistent open world MMORPG FFA sandbox game with full loot FPS/TPS combat. Now some people over at RoA are trying to turn it into something different IMO

I really don't care which version I just want something populated 24/7 with at least 5,000 active player... preferably 10,000 without having that it just feels like a private server and I refuse to get invested in another dead futureless game like i did UW and 2012 DFO

It's just too frustrating/ disappointing and a waste of time

AFAIC Ub3rgames and BPG should just do whatever the fuck they gotta do to get more people even if that means doing shit I personally don't like.

The persistent model of Darkfall is not sustainable. When the character is maxed and the banks are full, there is nothing but PVP for PVP sake. Grinds are cheap content, PVP on it's own is cheap content, throw in a rank, throw in a reward, they become way more valuable.

Fighting for ranks/elo/some type of point system is a damn near infinite grind. It will give purpose and reward to territory control/fights, I imagine titles, skins, or some other tangible reward as well as bragging rights for that good ole egofall.

RoA has always been looking to make Darkfall more accessible, and less of a tedious monstrosity with no real purpose, which is arguably one of the greatest pitfalls of the game.
  • Last Edit: April 29, 2018, 10:52:24 am by Seronys

This is DND, not any other iteration of DF. Everything is slower, and more local. It is the way it is.

  • SomeBK
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #131
How does it feel to know there's still more alts being logged into new dawn than there are total characters in RoA?

RoA has a long way to go before being a game to check back to
Fair enough ill be there, Actually can we do it Thurs
(ive been lugging boxes of books all morning from a collection I bought and a little beat)

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #132
There are plenty of ROA features that would be great little additions to DND, without altering the DND vision one iota.

While Sero and I have little overlap on what would make the best DND, I like his thinking on ranks and Egofall.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #133
i stop farm and leveling because its too dangerous at this state of game. After a dfo WIPE on a official server,its pretty risky to grind dead dnd.
When was no online,you could always farm mobs,but since even official servers can be wiped/closed,then you cant even pve now lol.

Re: Why did you stop playing?
Reply #134
Hey guys, just checking in, how's everything going? Is it time to admit we told you so or???

Darkfall was SUPPOSED to be a persistent open world MMORPG FFA sandbox game with full loot FPS/TPS combat.




we dont have enough players on this earth for darkfall sandbox mmorpg. So its better to make quake arena with amazing pvp.
If they make it like dota,you find match and enter arena with original dfo pvp then it will have more success,
Since original dfo pvp is the best,it doesnt matter you will pvping in open world or session game,it still will be the best.
Nothing wrong with dfo arena,it will be even better,without 2 hours riding. I play this game since 2010,and 85% of my time i just ride/pve.... I dont have enough pvp experience.Its like you play 8 years and have just ~10 hours of real fights. If i played quake for 8 years then i had 100% pvp experience without useless riding in dead textures.
  • Last Edit: April 29, 2018, 06:00:06 pm by 4ifirnul