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Topic: tracing the myth of loot apocalypse (Read 536 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: tracing the myth of loot apocalypse
Reply #15
I have faith in Ub3rgames assessment of what MUST be in at launch far more than people like Raap

They will launch when they need to. None of us have the full picture except them

Tired of kids who play 24/7 being the most negative and shitting where they eat. We had enough of that in the previous Darkfalls and RoA don't bring it here


  • Kenman
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Re: tracing the myth of loot apocalypse
Reply #16
Could I go so far as to suggest that perhaps many of the remaining changes will actually be far better suited as post-launch patches to keep players interested and playing?

Would that be too much? I'm looking at maejohls post of roadmaps and you can see a marked difference between launch and overall planned features.

I remember reading a post from ub3rgames that suggested it would be unwise to implement content patches before launch, as content is what keeps players playing.

With their position on this issue affirmed, you could go through the patch notes and check off items that are content and items that are not and find out exactly what is being worked on, no?

Re: tracing the myth of loot apocalypse
Reply #17
If I had new loot tables I wouldn't let you slobs see them.

Re: tracing the myth of loot apocalypse
Reply #18
Does seem like it's not as much of an apocalypse as it at first seemed like it would be. That's a shame but I'm wondering if they are not fast approaching the point of where they are having to cut things from what is most likely a lofty list of things they wanted to add. Would really be interesting to know how their deadlines look. How long can they stay in development for, are they starting to cut things or shuffle things around to after launch instead now and so on. Worrisome stuff that made me remember this Romero quote:

"Anyone in game development can tell you that this is a recipe for disaster [cutting content to reach deadlines]. The end of development is so crucial to the finished game becoming itself, taking on its ultimate personality, that shipping it before it's a cohesive experience is basically throwing years of effort and money into a fiery pit."

It's funny to because MMO games especially do this all the time and then they wonder why their playerbase didn't stick around waiting for the devs to make the product actually complete and make sense. It's terrible game design and not what an MMO is meant to do. The content that comes after launch should not be things that obviously needed to be part of the initial experience (hello racial war fronts) but rather things that just feel like amazing extra content that enhances the experience not something that patches the experience into completion.

Well fuckin' said.

Re: tracing the myth of loot apocalypse
Reply #19
[..]

Well fuckin' said.

except its not well said. maejohls post in here shows what the devs planned for launch from day 1 and told this pop about. so if ninogan is saying devs are cutting stuff from their original plan then hes just got it wrong. not saying the devs are saints and it does look like they cant communicate their progression for shit tho
  • Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 09:30:23 am by BigBadBear

Re: tracing the myth of loot apocalypse
Reply #20
Does seem like it's not as much of an apocalypse as it at first seemed like it would be. That's a shame but I'm wondering if they are not fast approaching the point of where they are having to cut things from what is most likely a lofty list of things they wanted to add. Would really be interesting to know how their deadlines look. How long can they stay in development for, are they starting to cut things or shuffle things around to after launch instead now and so on. Worrisome stuff that made me remember this Romero quote:

"Anyone in game development can tell you that this is a recipe for disaster [cutting content to reach deadlines]. The end of development is so crucial to the finished game becoming itself, taking on its ultimate personality, that shipping it before it's a cohesive experience is basically throwing years of effort and money into a fiery pit."

It's funny to because MMO games especially do this all the time and then they wonder why their playerbase didn't stick around waiting for the devs to make the product actually complete and make sense. It's terrible game design and not what an MMO is meant to do. The content that comes after launch should not be things that obviously needed to be part of the initial experience (hello racial war fronts) but rather things that just feel like amazing extra content that enhances the experience not something that patches the experience into completion.

Well fuckin' said.
Wipe that cum off your chin.
"If there is a supreme being, he's crazy."

My IQ is too high for you all.